Effect of bee pollen extract as a supplemental diet on broilers´s ross 308 breast and thigh meat muscles fatty acids

Authors

  • Peter Haščí­k Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Department of Evaluation and Processing of Animal Products, Trieda A. Hlinku 2, 949 76 Nitra
  • Ibrahim Elimam Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Department of Evaluation and Processing of Animal Products, Trieda A. Hlinku 2, 949 76 Nitra
  • Jozef Garlí­k Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Department of Evaluation and Processing of Animal Products, Trieda A. Hlinku 2, 949 76 Nitra
  • Marek Bobko Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Department of Evaluation and Processing of Animal Products, Trieda A. Hlinku 2, 949 76 Nitra
  • Jana Tkáčová Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Department of Evaluation and Processing of Animal Products, Trieda A. Hlinku 2, 949 76 Nitra
  • Miroslava Kačániová Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Sciences, Department of Microbiology, Trieda A. Hlinku 2, 949 76 Nitra

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5219/374

Keywords:

broiler Ross 308, bee pollen, feed mixture, fatty acid

Abstract

The present study was aimed to study the effect of the bee pollen extract on the broiler Ross 308 breast and thigh meat fatty acids. The experiment enrolled 90 chicks in one day old, which were divided into 3 groups (control, E1 and E2). The broiler has been bred in a cage condition for 42 days. To the experimental groups were added bee pollen extract in the amount (400, 800  mg.kg-1). The chickens have been bred in a cage conditions, each cage was equipped with feed dispenser and water intake was ensured ad libitum through a self feed-pump. The temperature was controlled during the fattening period and it was 33 °C at the first day and every week was reduced about 2 °C the end temperature was 23 °C. At the end of the experiment the fatty acids have beenevaluatedby using Agilent 7890A Gas Chromatograph apparatus (USA). The findings have been shown that the myristoleic acid, linoleic acid, linoelaidic acid, arachidonic acid, and archaic acid were decreased after using the bee pollen into broiler feed mixture otherwise, the bee pollen has been increased the polemic acids and oleic acid and there were found no significant differences (P ≥0.05) among all the experimental groups.From the recent experiment, we conclude that bee pollen extract has decreasedthe fattyacids except palmitoleic acid acid and oleic acid, whichwere higher compared to control groupand there were no significant differences (P ≥0.05) between experimental groups.

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References

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Published

2014-06-09

How to Cite

Haščí­k, P. ., Elimam, I. ., Garlí­k, J. ., Bobko, M. ., Tkáčová, J. ., & Kačániová, M. . (2014). Effect of bee pollen extract as a supplemental diet on broilers´s ross 308 breast and thigh meat muscles fatty acids. Potravinarstvo Slovak Journal of Food Sciences, 8(1), 167–171. https://doi.org/10.5219/374

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