Antioxidant properties of caroot juices and their impact on intestinal and probiotic bacteria

Authors

  • Aleksandra Duda-Chodak University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Fermentation Technology and Technical Microbiology, ul. Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow
  • Tomasz Tarko University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Fermentation Technology and Technical Microbiology, ul. Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow
  • Łukasz Wajda University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Fermentation Technology and Technical Microbiology, ul. Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow
  • Bożena Kręcioch University of Agriculture in Krakow, Faculty of Food Technology, Department of Fermentation Technology and Technical Microbiology, ul. Balicka 122, 30-149 Krakow

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5219/483

Keywords:

carrot juice, antibacterial activity, intestinal microbiota, probiotic

Abstract

There is a growing interest in non-dairy probiotic products. The main aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of juice prepared from 15 various cultivars of carrot on the growth of representatives of human intestinal microbiota (Bifidobacterium catenulatum, Escherichia coli) and probiotic strains (Lactobacillus acidophilus LA-5, Lactobacillus casei 01). Carrot juice was added to liquid medium at a final concentration of 5.0% and their impact on the bacteria number was assessed by measurement of the turbidity after 24 h of culture. The number of cells was expressed as % of positive control (medium without juice addition). Juices prepared from all tested cultivars of carrot inhibited the growth of Bifidobacterium catenulatum, and the strongest inhibitory effect was observed for juices obtained from the 'Kongo F1' cultivar (3.40 ±2.85% of positive control), 'Rumba F1'(4.17 ±2.27%) and 'Broker F1' (5.35 ±2.14%). The majority of tested juices also inhibited the growth of E. coli, but those prepared from the 'Niland F1', 'Napa F1', 'Afro F1'and 'Samba F1' cultivars stimulated the growth of this bacterium. The probiotic strains were less sensitive to carrot juice impact than intestinal species, however both stimulation and inhibition could be observed. Juices made from the cultivars 'Kongo F1' and 'Deep Purple F1' acted negatively on the growth of both probiotic strains, while juice from 'Bangor F1' cultivar inhibited L. casei 01 growth, but stimulated the growth of LA-5. The obtained results suggest that 'Kongo F1' and 'Deep Purple F1' cultivars are not suitable as an additive or raw material for the production of probiotic products, because of their inhibitory properties against probiotic strains. Concluding, carrots can be used as raw material for the production of probiotic beverages, however both the cultivar of carrot and the strains of probiotic bacteria used for the production should be selected carefully. The most suitable for production of probiotic beverages seems to be the 'Rumba F1', followed by the 'Polka F1' and 'Yellowstone F1' cultivars. They inhibited the growth of intestinal bacteria, which are undesirable in the final product, without negative effect on the probiotic species.

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References

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Published

2015-07-24

How to Cite

Duda-Chodak, A. ., Tarko, T. ., Wajda, Łukasz ., & Kręcioch, B. . (2015). Antioxidant properties of caroot juices and their impact on intestinal and probiotic bacteria. Potravinarstvo Slovak Journal of Food Sciences, 9(1), 337–341. https://doi.org/10.5219/483

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