Possibilities of microscopic detection of isolated porcine proteins in model meat products

Authors

  • Michaela Petrášová University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, Department of plant Origin Foodstuffs Hygiene and Technology Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno
  • Eliška Zichová University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, Department of plant Origin Foodstuffs Hygiene and Technology Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno
  • Matej Pospiech University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, Department of plant Origin Foodstuffs Hygiene and Technology Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno
  • Bohuslava Tremlová University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, Department of plant Origin Foodstuffs Hygiene and Technology Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno
  • Zdeňka Javůrková University of Veterinary and Pharmaceutical Sciences Brno, Faculty of Veterinary Hygiene and Ecology, Department of plant Origin Foodstuffs Hygiene and Technology Palackého tř. 1946/1, 612 42 Brno

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.5219/588

Keywords:

collagen, isolated protein, light microscopy

Abstract

In recent years, various protein additives intended for manufacture of meat products have increasing importance in the food industry. These ingredients include both, plant-origin as well as animal-origin proteins. Among animal proteins, blood plasma, milk protein or collagen are used most commonly. Collagen is obtained from pork, beef, and poultry or fish skin. Collagen does not contain all the essential amino acids, thus it is not a full protein in terms of essential amino acids supply for one's organism. However, it is rather rich in amino acids of glycine, hydroxyproline and proline which are almost absent in other proteins and their synthesis is very energy intensive. Collagen, which is added to the soft and small meat products in the form of isolated porcine protein, significantly affects the organoleptic properties of these products. This work focused on detection of isolated porcine protein in model meat products where detection of isolated porcine protein was verified by histological staining and light microscopy. Seven model meat products from poultry meat and 7 model meat products from beef and pork in the ratio of 1:1, which contained 2.5% concentration of various commercially produced isolated porcine proteins, were examined. These model meat products were histologically processed by means of cryosections and stained with hematoxylin-eosin staining, toluidine blue staining and Calleja. For the validation phase, Calleja was utilized. To determine the sensitivity and specificity, five model meat products containing the addition of isolated porcine protein and five model meat products free of it were used. The sensitivity was determined for isolated porcine protein at 1.00 and specificity was determined at 1.00. The detection limit of the method was at the level of 0.001% addition. Repeatability of the method was carried out using products with addition as well as without addition of isolated porcine protein and detection was repeated 10 times. Repeatability in both, positive and negative samples, for isolated porcine protein was determined at 100%. The results show that the histological processing of cryosections stained using Calleja is suitable for detecting isolated porcine protein in meat products.

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Published

2016-04-27

How to Cite

Petrášová, M. ., Zichová, E. ., Pospiech, M. ., Tremlová, B. ., & Javůrková, Z. . (2016). Possibilities of microscopic detection of isolated porcine proteins in model meat products. Potravinarstvo Slovak Journal of Food Sciences, 10(1), 202–206. https://doi.org/10.5219/588

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